Whiteford Taylor Preston LLP | Franchise & Business Law Group | About
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About

It is no secret that starting any kind of business can be a challenge for even the most seasoned entrepreneurs. When you enter the world of franchising, however, you face not only the “regular” small business issues, but also the dynamic of the franchisee-franchisor relationship.

David L. Cahn and the lawyers in the Franchise & Business Law Group at Whiteford, Taylor & Preston understand this relationship. They are a resource for entrepreneurs in the mid-Atlantic who seek legal advice and counsel from attorneys who concentrate in this unique area of law.

Our clients are: (1) franchising their proven business concepts; (2) purchasing a franchise, either as an existing business or to start up; or (3) active franchisees who have a dispute with their franchisor, are selling their franchise, or are purchasing or starting a non-franchised business.

Drawing on the resources of Whiteford's 180 lawyers located in 17 offices in Maryland and throughout the Mid-Atlantic, the Franchise & Business Law Group also represents many of its clients in commercial real estate leases or transactions, the buying or selling of an existing business, intellectual property protection and licensing, and tax controversies.

The Franchise & Business Law Group at Whiteford, Taylor & Preston is a proud member of the International Franchise Association.

About the Chair

David L. Cahn, a Baltimore native, has been representing franchisors and franchisees since the late 1990’s, as an advocate, negotiator and counselor. Prior to joining Whiteford Taylor & Preston in 2011, he founded and ran Franchise & Business Law Group as an independent Baltimore law firm from 2004 through 2010.

David earned his J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1995 and his B.A. from Stanford University in 1990.

His professional involvement includes serving on the Board for the Maryland State Bar Association’s Business Law Section, and he is the former Chair of the Association’s Franchise Law Committee. In addition, he has written many articles for area papers and has given seminars for attorneys and entrepreneurs, including, “Understanding and Negotiating A Franchise Agreement,” which he has co-taught for the Maryland, District of Columbia and Virginia bar associations.