Minimum Contacts in the Digital Age: Using Online Resources Can Subject You to Foreign Jurisdiction

October 9th, 2009

The United States District Court for the District of Maryland recently held that use of a company’s website can be sufficient to subject the user to jurisdiction in the state where the company resides. In CoStar Realty Information, Inc. v. Mark Field d/b/a Alliance Valuation Group, Case No. 08-00663, the Court held that the defendants, who resided in California, Florida and Texas, were subject to jurisdiction in Maryland based on their use of CoStar’s website (CoStar’s principal place of business is in Bethesda, Maryland). This means that, to avoid having a court judgment entered against them, they had to defend against the claim in Maryland.

A court may exercise jurisdiction over a defendant only if requiring the defendant to appear before the court will not infringe the defendant’s due process rights under the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The U.S. Supreme Court has held that the requirements of due process are satisfied where: (1) exercise of jurisdiction will not “offend traditional notions of fair play and substantial justice”; and (2) the defendant, as a result of its actions, “should reasonably anticipate being hailed [before the court].” State “long-arm” laws can further define specific actions or conduct that will satisfy these constitutional requirements.

In CoStar Realty, the defendants were alleged to have improperly shared a user ID and passcode for accessing CoStar’s subscription-based website, which had been authorized for use only by a limited number of individuals. The defendants regularly accessed CoStar’s website, and also used Co-Star’s live telephone support, representing themselves as valid customers. Otherwise, the Court did not cite any relationship between the defendants and the State of Maryland for purposes of the due process analysis. However, based on these actions alone, the defendants were found to have availed themselves of the privileges of doing business in Maryland and therefore were held subject to the Court’s jurisdiction.

The Court also noted that, even though the defendants were not valid CoStar customers, by using CoStar’s website they implicitly agreed to the website’s Terms of Use, which included, among other things, the user’s consent to jurisdiction in Maryland.

While jurisdiction in this case was based specifically on the defendants’ alleged wrongful actions, so-called “general jurisdiction” can be based on systematic and continuous contacts with the forum state, whether or not they relate directly to a plaintiff’s claims. With the rapid growth of Internet-based commerce, your online activities may subject you to potentially being sued in more states than you expect.

Copyright 2009

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